click to show more information

click to hide/show information About your Search

20121101
20121130
STATION
CNNW 8
CNN 2
CSPAN 2
MSNBCW 1
LANGUAGE
English 19
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)
waving because of an impending decision at the united nations. i'll ask israel's ambassador to the united states why he thinks -- why his country thinks the u.n.'s possibly interaction is a bad idea. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> we begin with today's hard words in the negotiations to avoid the so-called fiscal cliff. that steep across the board spending cut and tax increase scheduled to hit in just 33 days. in a scathing assessment today, the speaker of the house john boehner says there's been no substantive progress on a deal. need to realize there can be no deal without tax rates going up for top earners. let's go live to our chief white house correspondent jessica yellin. she's got more on the latest developments. tough talk from both sides, jessica. >> reporter: tough talk and some bright lines, wolf. on the same day that treasury secretary tim geithner went to capitol hill to meet with both democrats and republicans to talk about these negotiations, there is tense body language and tough words on both sides of pennsylvania avenue. they're starting to sound du
two 2 1/2 hours the u.n. set to recognize palestine as a state. while israel and the united states oppose the vote the palestinians are expected to receive overwhelming support in the general assembly. in europe several countries, including france, spain, denmark, have announced they will vote to approve palestine ace nonmember state. and in a blow to u.s. and israeli opposition, germany said this morning it will abstain rather than voting no. america's closest ally the united kingdom is expected to abstain. palestinians are also receiving support from israel's former prime minister, who hold "the daily beast," quote i believe the palestinian request from the u.n. is congruent with the basic concept of the two state solution. i see no reason to oppose it. once the united nations will lay the foundations for the idea we and israel have to encourage a serious -- engage in a serious process of negotiations. hillary clinton disagrees. >> we oppose palestinian efforts to upgrade their status at the u.n., outside of the framework of negotiations to achieve a two-state solution because, n
prime minister salam fayyad. he's in washington to attend the 2012 saban forum on u.s./israel relations. it's my understanding you were against this at first. is that true? and if so, how do you feel now? >> no. i never was against it. as a matter of fact, i was very much a part of the thinking -- >> did you think it was time now? or some time down in the future? >> given the frustrations that we palestinians have had with the political process, it has not been productive. there's no question that we needed to pursue any and all available options to us. and the international law -- with the national diplomacy. and this was one of them. the question for me all along was how best to do it. provide us with some leverage going forward because what we really want end of day is genuine state where our people can live as free people with dignity. >> at the end we were just talking in the break, does this end up helping or hurting your relationship with the united states, your pursuit of something even more tangible? >> i think it depends a lot on what is done to deal with it. and whether or no
to witness the vote. the united states, israel and other western countries oppose this move by the palestines. palestinians. more than a dozen european countries are supporting this rez lug. the uk says it may vote yes pending a couple of conditions. the u.s. has supported a two-state resolution for palestinians and israelis. why do american officials oppose u.n. recognition? >> for the most part it won't give the palestinians what they want, which is an actual state. this vote is largely symbolic. it would have no effect on the palestinian sovereignty or borders or any of the things they're looking for. israel is vehemently opposed to this vote. it said it threatened to cut off aid to the palestinians, impose new checkpoints if they do so. what the u.s. is fearing here is that if this vote goes ahead, and we see that it's pretty much a guarantee that it will -- that the palestinians will be upgraded at the u.n., basically it's not going to lead to anything good on the ground. what the u.s. is afraid of is that it will lead to more violence if the palestinians don't see their state actually r
and have an impact and obviously israel, which is having already grave concerns as we do about, for example, movements of chemical weapons that might occur in such a chaotic atmosphere. and that could have an impact not just within syria, but on the region as a whole. i'm encouraged to see that the syrian opposition created an umbrella group that may have more cohesion than they had in the past. we're going to be talking to them, my envoys will be traveling to, you know, various meetings that are going to be taking place want international community and the opposition. we consider them a legitimate representation of the aspirations of the syrian people. we're not yet prepared to recognize them as some sort of government in exile, but we do think that it is a broad-based representative group. one of the questions that we're going to continue to press is making sure that opposition is committed to a democratic syria, an inclusive syria, a moderate syria. we have seen extremist elements insinuate themselves into the opposition. and, you know, one of the things we have to be on guard about, par
, on the constitution and the attack on the judges right after he brokered the deal between israel and hamas. so he was already rending services in the international community and then asking for a license at home. it's really basically a page from the book of hosni mubarak. i think in washington, there is great uncertainty, what to do with the islamists in power. this is not just from this crisis of november 2b 22nd, this crisis of the last week behind us. this has been the case since the fall of the dictatorship of hosni mubarak, what to do with the islamists in egypt, what to do with the islamists in tunisia and what to do with the rise of the islamists in the region as a whole. >> over the weekend, senator john mccain said, our dollars will be directly related to the progress towards democracy. if you add up all the economic and military assistance the u.s. gives egypt every year, it's about $1.5 billion. should that be used as leverage to try to get egypt back on this democracy road? >> well, i usually have great deference to the opinions of senator mccain. i see things on national security th
that would boost their status on the world stage. the united states and israel have lobbied hard against the move warning it could backfire and actually set back palestinian hopes for full statehood and negotiated peace. but with some key european nations on board, palestinians view the vote as a game changer. cnn's frederik pleitgen reports from the west bank city of ramallah. >> reporter: the final rally before heading to new york, palestinian president mahmoud abass addressing supporters. the final decision is to head to the united nations tomorrow he says to enhance the position of palestine to an observers state in the united states and the first step to achieve all our national palestinian rights. if the palestinians win a majority in the u.n. general assemb assembly, the u.n. will recognize palestine as a nonmember observer state like the vatican. its territory to include the west bank, gaza and east jerusalem. >> for the world to begin to rectify a grave historical unjustice that the palestinians had undergone beginning with the creation of the state of israel in 1948. >> reporte
in the u.n. human rights council which has been very anti-israel. and her defense is, look, we do it because it would have been even worse if america hadn't been there to defend israel as this israel bashing went on. >> part of the problem with that statement is that it's indefensible. she made that statement two weeks after the human rights council finished a session in which it passed more israel-bashing resolutions than it had at any session before. so if her presence is doing any good -- or our presence is doing any good, it's not perceptible. megyn: what about syria? we've lost our focus on it in the recent weeks and months with the election, but they are involved in a civil war now, and it was said that bashar assad was about to go. well, he hasn't gone, and, you know, thousands upon thousands of children are dying in syria, many being tortured in front of tear families, and the -- in front of their families, and the unite isn't doing that much. we tried to do something at the united nations, it failed. >> it failed in large measure because the chinese and russians -- with w
and israel. supporting it are major nations such as france, russia, china, spain, denmark, portugal, ireland, britain and australia expected to abstain. it will certainly have widespread implications for the fragile middle east, bill. bill: where are the israelis on this rather? what is their response, eric? >> reporter: yeah the israelis say that status could only come from direct talks with no preconditions. those peace talks have stalled because of the continued building in the west bank and continued violence we've seen in the gaza. this does come on the 65th anniversary of the partition that created the two-state solutions, something palestinians and arabs rejected for three generations. >> direct negotiations is the dna of israeli-palestinian political process. any attempt to exert external pressure on israel would serve as a setback to those who are really interested in peace. if what you're interested in is public relations, then, this whole thing is just an exercise in futility. >> reporter: but hamas is now on board. they have rejected this until this weekend when they say they wil
is at a wine tasting. we have we've got israel conflicts, syria, pending issues with iran. not a lot of trump with the muslim brotherhood. where are the priorities? >> you think this would be the exactly the time when you need your secretary of state engaged full force. anticipating the hearings coming up in congress and she finds herself conveniently out of touch in australia. she was the one that general petraeus resigned and took him off the stage. now hillary clinton is out. she is off the stage for now. we'll continue to drill on this but the balance of power and u.s. influence does need a secretary of state on tab. we've got two things, the continuing developments in benghazi and how we have to investigate that completely. plus to avert a disaster in the middle east. i don't see her on the job. >> iran, libya, where is the secretary of state. why isn't she testifying this week. the american people have a right to know. what they knew, when they knew it. our state department was watching libya unfold in realtime. >> benghazi is more than just a murder investigation of four fellow citizen
syria and have an impact and obviously israel which is having already grave concerns as we do about, for example, movements of chemical weapons that might occur in such a chaotic atmosphere. and they could have an impact not just within syria but on the reas a whole. i'm encouraged to see that the syrian opposition created an umbrella group that may have more cohesion than they had in the past. we're going to be talking to them, my envoys are going to be traveling to various meetings taking place with the international community and the opposition. we consider them a legitimate representative of the aspirations of the syrian people. we're not yet prepared to recognize them as some sort of government in exile. but we do think it is it's a broad-based representative group. one of the questions we're going to continue to express is making sure that that opposition is committed to a democratic syria, an inclusive syria, a moderate syria. we have seen extremist elements insinuate themselves into the opposition. and one of the things that we have to be on gourd about, particularly when wi
plan to back the bid. britain, the u.s. and, of course, israel oppose it. no country has veto power in the general assembly so no one can actually block it. >>> now buenos aires, argentina, for the pole dance south america championship. this is called
about five races that we were watching very carefully. my first time was spent working with steve israel to make sure we had the resources to prevail in those races. my second time i spent was to call people who were not successful in this particular election. everybody here was getting a lot of calls -- a running is very noisy. not succeeding, the phones do not ring that much. so i wanted to hear from them, what their views were about how we go forward. then to take the calls of my colleagues to see what their view is. what i talked about here, about changing the role of money in politics, is really very important motivator for me to stay in the leader's office. i think it must be done. when people say money did not make any difference in the campaign, they all wasted their money -- that really was not true. the president of the united states, the most well known, respected person on the planet, had to spend about $1 billion to set the record straight from what that big money was putting out there. senate races, house races, tammy duckworth had $7 million spent against her of outside mo
, which is important for israel and important for that region. there is a huge amount of work to be done because both president obama and mitt romney had basically said and have carved out the position that president assad must go. but they are doing nothing, certainly not u.s. administration has done nothing to make sure that that happens. and so that could leave the u.s. a little bit exposed to charges of weakness. and today his closest pal if you like, british prime minister david cameron, who was the first to congratulate president obama, said that he really wants to talk to, quote, barack, to figure out how to solve the syrian crisis. >> a lot to come. thanks, christiane. president obama might have won re-election last night but he lost the white house by 20 points. we're going to talk about the changing face of america. what it means for the future of both parties. >> it doesn't matter whether you're black or white or hispanic or asian or native american or young or old or rich or poor, abled, disabled, gay or straight, you can make it here in america if you are willing to try. [ m
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)